Submarket 8

http://regionalhousingsolutions.webitects.com/submarket/8

Suburban 1980-99 housing stock, high/middle income, suburban, aging

Submarket 8 is a suburban and low density submarket largely built after 1980. Primarily made up of owner-occupied homes where higher household incomes more than offset higher home prices and rents. Transportation costs are significantly higher than the regional average. Foreclosures have taken place in this submarket, but not nearly at the levels seen elsewhere. Vacancy rates are low. Like submarket 7 this submarket consists of mostly two to four person middle aged, middle- to-higher-income families with a moderate level of educational attainment and a steady decrease in the number of children per family. Population is growing in this submarket.

Key stats

  • Lower density housing largely built after 1980
  • Mostly owner-occupied
  • Population growing, most notably among seniors
  • Middle to upper income families
  • High transportation costs

Geography

Chicago and the region

Entire region
37% of the entire region is in Submarket 8

Chicago communities

How much of each chicago community is in Submarket 8.

  1. North Park 32%

Municipalities

How much of each municipality is in Submarket 8.

  1. Antioch 100%
  2. Beecher 100%
  3. Braceville 100%
  4. Burlington 100%
  5. Cary 100%
  6. Elwood 100%
  7. Fox River Grove 100%
  8. Godley 100%
  9. Indian Creek 100%
  10. Indian Head Park 100%
  11. Lake Villa 100%
  12. Lindenhurst 100%
  13. Millbrook 100%
  14. Millington 100%
  15. Oakwood Hills 100%
  16. Old Mill Creek 100%
  17. Orland Hills 100%
  18. Peotone 100%
  19. Plano 100%
  20. Port Barrington 100%
  21. Prairie Grove 100%
  22. Sandwich 100%
  23. Sleepy Hollow 100%
  24. Symerton 100%
  25. Tower Lakes 100%
  26. Trout Valley 100%
  27. Wadsworth 100%
  28. West Dundee 100%
  29. Wonder Lake 100%
  30. Bull Valley 99%
  31. Greenwood 98%
  32. Channahon 97%
  33. Green Oaks 97%
  34. Third Lake 96%
  35. Burr Ridge 91%
  36. Lemont 90%
  37. Gurnee 89%
  38. Monee 89%
  39. Ringwood 87%
  40. Campton Hills 86%
  41. Palos Park 86%
  42. East Dundee 85%
  43. Orland Park 85%
  44. St. Charles 85%
  45. Island Lake 82%
  46. Mokena 82%
  47. Batavia 81%
  48. Bartlett 80%
  49. Crystal Lake 79%
  50. Frankfort 79%
  51. Spring Grove 79%
  52. Algonquin 78%
  53. Lake Zurich 77%
  54. Lake Barrington 76%
  55. Mettawa 76%
  56. Olympia Fields 76%
  57. Park City 76%
  58. Winfield 72%
  59. Warrenville 71%
  60. Carol Stream 70%
  61. Bloomingdale 69%
  62. Itasca 69%
  63. Wauconda 69%
  64. Volo 68%
  65. South Elgin 64%
  66. Lily Lake 61%
  67. Grayslake 59%
  68. Naperville 59%
  69. Mundelein 58%
  70. Inverness 57%
  71. Oswego 57%
  72. Woodstock 57%
  73. Palos Heights 56%
  74. West Chicago 56%
  75. Willow Springs 56%
  76. Homer Glen 55%
  77. New Lenox 53%
  78. Buffalo Grove 52%
  79. Lake in the Hills 51%
  80. McHenry 51%
  81. Geneva 50%
  82. Long Grove 49%
  83. Riverwoods 49%
  84. Streamwood 47%
  85. Darien 46%
  86. Tinley Park 46%
  87. Zion 46%
  88. Hawthorn Woods 45%
  89. Manhattan 45%
  90. Roselle 45%
  91. Round Lake Heights 44%
  92. Vernon Hills 44%
  93. Westchester 43%
  94. Aurora 40%
  95. Braidwood 40%
  96. Countryside 40%
  97. Johnsburg 40%
  98. Lakemoor 40%
  99. Winthrop Harbor 40%
  100. Deer Park 39%
  101. Matteson 39%
  102. Lincolnwood 38%
  103. Yorkville 38%
  104. Carpentersville 37%
  105. Fox Lake 37%
  106. Glendale Heights 36%
  107. Minooka 36%
  108. North Aurora 36%
  109. Hanover Park 35%
  110. Lincolnshire 35%
  111. North Barrington 35%
  112. Lakewood 34%
  113. Woodridge 34%
  114. Country Club Hills 33%
  115. Waukegan 32%
  116. Flossmoor 31%
  117. Joliet 31%
  118. Prospect Heights 31%
  119. University Park 31%
  120. Barrington Hills 30%
  121. Morton Grove 29%
  122. Round Lake Beach 29%
  123. Hoffman Estates 27%
  124. Palatine 27%
  125. Shorewood 27%
  126. Schaumburg 26%
  127. Willowbrook 26%
  128. Elgin 24%
  129. Libertyville 23%
  130. Lombard 23%
  131. Arlington Heights 22%
  132. Hainesville 22%
  133. Barrington 21%
  134. Crest Hill 20%
  135. Crete 20%
  136. Des Plaines 20%
  137. Oak Forest 20%
  138. Romeoville 20%
  139. Beach Park 19%
  140. Bolingbrook 19%
  141. Wayne 18%
  142. Elburn 17%
  143. Lisle 17%
  144. Park Ridge 17%
  145. Wilmington 17%
  146. Deerfield 16%
  147. Mount Prospect 16%
  148. Western Springs 15%
  149. Lake Forest 14%
  150. Plainfield 14%
  151. Addison 13%
  152. Highland Park 13%
  153. Lockport 13%
  154. Elk Grove Village 11%
  155. Glenview 11%
  156. Hazel Crest 11%
  157. Westmont 11%
  158. Wheeling 11%
  159. Wheaton 8%
  160. Glen Ellyn 6%
  161. Hinsdale 6%
  162. Gilberts 5%
  163. Montgomery 5%
  164. Downers Grove 3%
  165. Hillside 3%
  166. Huntley 3%
  167. North Chicago 3%
  168. Clarendon Hills 2%
  169. Homewood 2%
  170. Kildeer 2%
  171. Newark 2%
  172. Wood Dale 2%
  173. Bannockburn 1%
  174. Highwood 1%
  175. Rockdale 1%
  176. Steger 1%

Counties

How much of each county is in Submarket 8.

  1. Will County 57%
  2. Lake County 54%
  3. Kendall County 41%
  4. DuPage County 41%
  5. McHenry County 31%
  6. Kane County 28%
  7. Cook County 17%

Issues + strategies

Quantitative analysis and many interviews with housing experts from across the region helped identify issues facing the region’s housing markets, as well as potential solutions. Although many more housing and non-housing issues affect this submarket, the housing issues and strategies identified below represent the most significant challenges and most promising solutions in this submarket. The outlined strategies feature proven projects, programs, or other efforts undertaken in communities across the region to address similar challenges or capitalize on similar opportunities.


Accessibility and visitability

Improving accessibility and visitability can prepare communities for a growing senior population. A growing senior population raises concerns about whether submarket 8 communities are prepared as accessible and visitable places to live. As new housing is built or current housing is rehabilitated, attention should be given to make sure that housing will address the present and future needs of this population. Some submarket 8 neighborhoods were built without important pedestrian infrastructure, like sidewalks and crosswalks. Figuring out how to retrofit such infrastructure into existing neighborhoods would also improve accessibility, as well as position communities to remain attractive as market preferences change.

Strategies (expand all)

Age-friendly neighborhoods Communities should create local amenities that will appeal to people of all ages, from young families to seniors.
Communities should create local amenities that will appeal to people of all ages, from young families to seniors. A community can best meet its social and economic demands by having a healthy balance of people from all age groups. Nevertheless, municipalities need to plan for amenities that can attract and retain residents. Neighborhood parks, public spaces and community art spaces such as Karcher Artspace Lofts in Waukegan and those created by Batavia, are only a few of the central elements of an age-friendly community. For seniors that want to live independently in the community, having access to services is vital. Municipalities should think about the development of senior housing/services complexes strategically, and ideally should locate them near transit stations and commercial areas. Such developments can be helped by specific transit oriented development ordinances like Chicago’s, which allow increased residential density and reduced parking requirements. Sunset Woods in Highland Park and Thomas Place in Glenview are great examples of developments that came to fruition because of strong collaboration between developers and municipalities. The Northwest Suburban Housing Collaborative’s Handyman Program is an innovative senior service program that connects seniors to low-cost maintenance services and helps them to live independently in their homes. Read more about age-friendly policies.
Value of housing planning Municipalities should invest in long-term planning to identify policies and tools that prepare its housing stock for the future.
Municipalities should invest in long-term planning to identify policies and tools that prepare its housing stock for the future. Via planning tools like the Homes for a Changing Region Toolkit, municipalities can better understand current and future housing needs in their communities and develop strategies to move toward a more “balanced” housing stock. Around the region, communities have been drawing on the principles of accessibility and sustainability to create healthier and safer housing. Plainfield’s experience in housing development is instructive as well as its density bonus program, which provides an increase in residential density above a base level if a given development meets one or more of 15 village objectives. Community “buy in” regarding balanced housing is more likely to occur if a community creates a housing committee similar to those created by Highland Park and Lake Forest. Municipalities that are interested in incorporating greater accessibility/visitability standards into new development or rehab of existing single-family homes should review Bolingbrook’s accessibility/visitability requirements.

Attracting younger families

Communities have an opportunity to attract younger families by striking the right balance between affordable homes and amenities. Younger families generally need affordable starter home price points in order to become new homebuyers. Additionally, providing amenities such as walkable neighborhoods, parks, and open spaces can help meet the preferences of younger generations, such as increased interest in biking and walking and more compact home environments.

Strategies (expand all)

Age-friendly neighborhoods Communities should create local amenities that will appeal to people of all ages, from young families to seniors.
Communities should create local amenities that will appeal to people of all ages, from young families to seniors. A community can best meet its social and economic demands by having a healthy balance of people from all age groups. Nevertheless, municipalities need to plan for amenities that can attract and retain residents. Neighborhood parks, public spaces and community art spaces such as Karcher Artspace Lofts in Waukegan and  those created by Batavia, are only a few of the central elements of an age-friendly community. Learn more about age-friendly neighborhood strategies.
Placemaking and marketing strategies Communities should develop strategies to create greater neighborhood identity in order to encourage additional private sector investment.
Communities should develop strategies to create greater neighborhood identity in order to encourage additional private sector investment. Municipalities can make a concerted effort to enhance neighborhood character in Submarket 8 through strategic public investments such as neighborhood branding/signage, streetlights, sidewalks, etc. As noted before, adding pedestrian infrastructure to these existing neighborhoods will be particularly valuable. Public sector investment will likely signal to the private market a commitment to an area and make it more attractive for additional resources. Learn more about placemaking strategies.
Repurpose and redevelop property Communities should evaluate existing zoning and take stock of existing infrastructure when making decisions about redevelopment.
Communities should evaluate existing zoning and take stock of existing infrastructure when making decisions about redevelopment. Overdeveloped and vacant retail areas can be rezoned for mixed-use developments or housing. When adding multi-family units near transit, municipalities should consider lower parking requirements to relieve congestion and encourage walkability. Mundelein’s Downtown Design Guidelines, Glenview’s Downtown Development Code, and Libertyville’s payment in lieu of required parking policy are all great examples of how to create a more efficient built environment.

Need for more diverse housing options

The housing stock of communities should accommodate households of various sizes and income levels. Housing stock that is uniform in both its size and type can result in missed opportunities for communities to attract new residents and jobs. While most of the submarket’s housing stock consists of newer single-family homes, communities have an opportunity to increase the diversification of their housing stock through new development or retrofitting existing stock. An increase in the mix of housing types can appeal to a wider buyer pool and allow submarket 8 communities to remain competitive as market conditions change.

Strategies (expand all)

Value of housing planning Municipalities should invest in long-term planning to identify policies and tools that prepare its housing stock for the future.
Municipalities should invest in long-term planning to identify policies and tools that prepare its housing stock for the future. Via planning tools like the Homes for a Changing Region Toolkit, municipalities can better understand current and future housing needs in their communities and develop strategies to move toward a more “balanced” housing stock. Around the region, communities have been drawing on the principles of accessibility and sustainability to create healthier and safer housing. Plainfield’s experience in housing development is instructive as well as its density bonus program, which provides an increase in residential density above a base level if a given development meets one or more of 15 village objectives. Community “buy in” regarding balanced housing is more likely to occur if a community creates a housing committee similar to those created by Highland Park and Lake Forest. Municipalities that are interested in incorporating greater accessibility/visitability standards into new development or rehab of existing single-family homes should review Bolingbrook’s accessibility/visitability requirements.

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